Archive for the ‘Screencast’ Category

June

09

by Kaj Kandler

Plan-B for OpenOffice.org celebrates the milestone of 100 help topic screencasts for OpenOffice.org Writer.

This week we added some topics around paragraph formatting and using tab stops. The latest batch contains the following help topics:

May

24

by Kaj Kandler

Plan-B for OpenOffice.org has grown to 110 screencasts and 157 glossary entires.

This is our Plan-B approach to documenting the popular open source office suite with screencasts (short videos) and smart search technology that helps you find what you are looking for.

If you have not checked it out, please join the other ~150 a day that visit this site teaching OpenOffice.org. If you like it come back like the growing number of repeat visitors. If you love it, register for more benefits to come.

May

22

by Kaj Kandler

I would like to present today some new screencasts for OpenOffice.org Draw, the vector graphics application in the OpenOffice.org suite.

We posted some basic screencasts for OpenOffice.org Draw yesterday.

While these number of screencasts for Draw is still small, the set is already useful. Lets assume you want to create a flow chart. A novice user might create some rectangles, and draw ellipses and connect these with lines. However, this will require careful planning so you position all the boxes first and the draw the lines. If you need to move any of the shapes you also have to adjust the end points of the lines.

You are probably better off to draw shapes from the flow chart menu, which gives you all the elements that are normed for this type of drawing. Then use object connectors to build a flexible mesh of objects and their connections. These connectors stick to the connection port of the objects and do move with the objects.

Finally, you annotate your flow chart with text frames and add potential notes withcallout bubbles.

November

21

by Kaj Kandler

On November 14th, Conficio (my company) released "Plan-B™ for OpenOffice.org" a support website for non-technical users. The release is a public beta test and a major milestone in our work.

In our press release titled "Plan-B™ for OpenOffice.org – The innovative support service for non-technical users – starts public beta test" we write:

Plan-B™ for OpenOffice.org is the first website that creates a comprehensive documentation of the application suite based on visual instructions. Kaj Kandler, founder of Conficio, is convinced "Non-technical users learn better with visual instructions like short videos." He says, "We are very excited to offer this new technology to the fast growing user base of OpenOffice.org, the free open source office suite. Plan-B™ for OpenOffice.org especially benefits users who migrate from other office suites." This service, with its easy to understand help topics, supports the on demand needs of users at all levels of expertise.

I’d like to encourage all my readers to check out this new service. I’d appreciate if you would leave a comment on this blog or send me a message through the feedback on every page that contains a screencast.

Expect me to explain the various features and benefits in the next few weeks on this blog.

And by all means, register at Plan-B for OpenOffice.org if you find the service helpful.

August

02

by Kaj Kandler

Steve Rubel from Micro Persuasion and Matt McAlister comment today on screencasting with advertising. They refer to Infoworld’s new series of screencasts, where they now add an advertisement trailer.

Just in case, Infoworld intends to patent this one, I claim prior art since 2003.

See http://www.conficio.com/ (wayback machine)

I did not make this for money reasons nor did I use arbitrary ads. I simply used it to make the time required to load the screencast more entertaining and to benefit the sponsor (or buyer) of the screencast.

November

07

by Kaj Kandler

I love to help people with their computers. I also love to solve problems.

The current state of computer ‘online’ help is a problem. Wouldn’t you agree? Users have given up on using the help-menu in software applications. The typical complain goes:

1) I can’t find what I’m looking for!

2) If I find something, I have a hard time understanding the prose!

I set out to solve this problem by creating visual help.